Safety Considerations for the Inpatient Medication-Use Process in Pediatric and Neonatal Patients

Authors

  • Rowan Elkeshawi, BPS Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2087-8596
  • Katherine K. Maddox, BPS, BS Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8774-7622
  • Andriana T. Xenophontos, BPS, BS Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7478-1792
  • Kyle Hampson, PharmD Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University, Department of Pharmacotherapy Services, The Brooklyn Hospital Center https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1255-3764

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33940/pediatrics/2022.1.3

Keywords:

pediatric, neonatal, medication safety, medication use process, formulary, medication reconciliation, administration, ordering, dispensing, computerized physician order entry (CPOE)

Abstract

The delivery of safe and effective healthcare to pediatric and neonatal patients presents unique challenges to the medication-use system. The diversity of patients within this population and the consequences of ontogeny on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics directly impact the safe use of medications in children and increase the risk of adverse drug events. This review will explore the medication-use system for hospitalized children and neonates, discuss vulnerabilities within this system, and provide examples of advancements made to improve the pediatric medication-use system.

Author Biographies

Rowan Elkeshawi, BPS, Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University

Rowan Elkeshawi is a pharmacy student in her final year at the Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Long Island University in Brooklyn, New York.  She previously earned a Bachelor of Professional Studies from Long Island University - Brooklyn. Upon graduation, she is pursuing residency training and hopes to work in ambulatory care.

Katherine K. Maddox, BPS, BS, Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University

Katherine Maddox is a pharmacy student in her final year at ​the Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (Long Island University Pharmacy) in Brooklyn, New York, where she also pursues her master’s in public health. She previously earned a Bachelor of Science in biology from the University of North Carolina Wilmington and a Bachelor of Professional Studies from Long Island University Brooklyn. Upon graduation, she is pursuing residency training and has a special interest in ambulatory care.

Andriana T. Xenophontos, BPS, BS, Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University

Andriana Xenophontos is a pharmacy student in her final year at the Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (Long Island University Pharmacy) in Brooklyn, New York. She previously earned her bachelor’s degree from the New York Institute of Technology with a focus on life sciences and premedical studies, and a Bachelor of Professional Studies from Long Island University Brooklyn. Upon graduation, she is pursuing employment at CVS Health as a community pharmacist. As an immunizer, she has administered hundreds of vaccines, including COVID-19 and influenza, throughout different clinics and pharmacies. Her research interests include pharmacist impacts on neurological disorders like migraines and seizures. Xenophontos also enjoys spending time with her fiancé and family, cooking, traveling, and watching The Office.

Kyle Hampson, PharmD, Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University, Department of Pharmacotherapy Services, The Brooklyn Hospital Center

Kyle Hampson (kyle.hampson@liu.edu) is an assistant professor of Pharmacy Practice at the Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (Long Island University Pharmacy) in Brooklyn, New York. He earned his Doctor of Pharmacy at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and completed both pharmacy practice and nutrition support pharmacy residencies at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. He has 10 years of clinical pharmacy experience in nutrition support and pediatrics and is a board-certified nutrition support pharmacist (BCNSP), board-certified pediatric pharmacy specialist (BCPPS), and a certified nutrition support clinician (CNSC).

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Published

2022-01-12

How to Cite

Elkeshawi, R., Maddox, K., Xenophontos, A. T., & Hampson, K. (2022). Safety Considerations for the Inpatient Medication-Use Process in Pediatric and Neonatal Patients. Patient Safety, 4(SI), 30–35. https://doi.org/10.33940/pediatrics/2022.1.3
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