Integration of Medication Safety Training and Development of a Culture of Safety in Pharmacy Education

Authors

  • Amaris Fuentes, PharmD Houston Methodist
  • Mabel Truong, PharmD University of Houston College of Pharmacy https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1358-7552
  • Vidya Saldivar, PharmD Houston Methodist
  • Mobolaji Adeola, PharmD Houston Methodist

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33940/culture/2022.1.2

Keywords:

medication safety, pharmacy education, safety culture

Abstract

Medication safety events with the potential for patient harm do occur in healthcare settings. Pharmacists are regularly tasked with utilizing their medication knowledge to optimize the medication-use process and reduce the likelihood of error.

To prepare for these responsibilities in professional practice, it is important to introduce patient safety principles during educational experiences. The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) have set forth accreditation standards focused on the management of medication-use processes to ensure these competencies during pharmacy didactic learning and postgraduate training.

The experience described here provides perspective on educational and experiential opportunities across the continuum of pharmacy education, with a focus on a relationship between a college of pharmacy and healthcare system. Various activities, including discussions, medication event reviews, audits, and continuous quality improvement efforts, have provided the experiences to achieve standards for these pharmacy learners. These activities support a culture of safety from early training.

Author Biographies

Amaris Fuentes, PharmD, Houston Methodist

Amaris Fuentes (afuentes@houstonmethodist.org) is currently the system medication safety specialist at Houston Methodist, where she supports medication safety initiatives, education, and research. She graduated from the University of Houston College of Pharmacy in 2011 and completed PGY1 and PGY2 critical care specialty pharmacy residency at Houston Methodist after graduation. She has prior experience in solid organ transplantation and critical care prior to transitioning to her current medication safety role. Her research interests include anticoagulation management, high-risk medication management, and leveraging clinical decision support to advance patient safety.

Mabel Truong, PharmD, University of Houston College of Pharmacy

Mabel Truong is currently the director of Institutional Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs) and clinical assistant professor at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy (UHCOP). She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from UHCOP and completed her PGY1 pharmacy practice residency at Saint Joseph East in Lexington, Kentucky. She then received her board certification in pharmacotherapy and served as a clinical pharmacist focusing on internal medicine at the University of Louisville Hospital and HCA Houston Healthcare Clear Lake prior to becoming a faculty member at UHCOP in 2020. Her areas of research interests involve experiential training and medication safety.

Vidya Saldivar, PharmD, Houston Methodist

Vidya Saldivar is currently a medication safety specialist at Houston Methodist Hospital, where she collaborates with hospital leaders and frontline staff to improve medication safety. She received her Bachelor of Science in pharmacy and Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of Houston College of Pharmacy. During her 24 years as an inpatient pharmacist, she has honed her skills as a clinician, leader, and an educator.

Mobolaji Adeola, PharmD, Houston Methodist

Mobolaji Adeola earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Temple University in Philadelphia. After graduation, she completed a pharmacy practice residency at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and moved on to complete an internal medicine pharmacy residency at Houston Methodist in Houston, Texas. She is a board-certified pharmacotherapy specialist. In her current role as a medication safety specialist in a dynamic healthcare system, she advocates for patient safety and has championed several quality improvement projects to promote rational medication use. She is passionate about healthcare education and the delivery of high-impact, patient-centered, evidence-based innovative solutions to optimize patient care. Prior to medication safety, she served acute care patients as an internal medicine clinical pharmacy specialist.

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woman pharmacist

Published

2022-01-12

How to Cite

Fuentes, A., Truong, M., Saldivar, V., & Adeola, M. (2022). Integration of Medication Safety Training and Development of a Culture of Safety in Pharmacy Education. Patient Safety, 4(SI), 20–25. https://doi.org/10.33940/culture/2022.1.2
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