Comparison of Simulation-Only vs. Simulation + Live Training in Paracentesis

Authors

  • Gaetan Sgro, MD Medicine Service Line, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System; Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6978-9404
  • Monique Kelly, PhD Research Service Line, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System
  • Ruth Preisner, MD Medicine Service Line, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System; Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33940/med/2021.9.5

Keywords:

simulation training, graduate medical education, paracentesis

Abstract

Visual abstract paracentesis

Background Several studies have examined the effects of simulation and live training experiences on abdominal paracentesis skills, but no study has examined the durability of such training or compared skills retention between the simulation-only and hybrid training approaches.

Methods A subset of internal medicine residents who participated in simulation-based training in abdominal paracentesis were assigned to an additional, live training experience. Procedural knowledge and skill were assessed following initial training and at six months, and compared between groups.

Results Complete data was available for 29 out of 37 residents who received simulation-only training and 18 out of 23 who received simulation plus live training. There were no statistical differences in procedural skills scores at either point in time. The simulation plus live training group achieved a higher mean score on the knowledge test at six months (p = 0.006).

Conclusions Simulation-based training is sufficient for achieving initial mastery in abdominal paracentesis, but not for maintaining paracentesis skills at six months in the absence of structured, maintenance training. The addition of a live training experience to complement the simulation training was not sufficient to prevent skills decline.

Author Biographies

Gaetan Sgro, MD, Medicine Service Line, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System; Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Gaetan Sgro (Gaetan.sgro@va.gov) is an academic hospitalist at the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System, where he serves as site director of the chief resident in Quality and Patient Safety Program and director of inpatient resident education for the Medicine service line. He is also a clinical assistant professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and an associate program director for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s Internal Medicine Residency Program.

Monique Kelly, PhD, Research Service Line, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System

Monique B. Kelly is a statistician at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System where she supports research and operational activities of investigators across the VA via the Research Office’s StatCore statistical, database, and epidemiological group.

Ruth Preisner, MD, Medicine Service Line, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System; Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Ruth Preisner is an academic internist at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, where she serves as the director of the Primary Care Procedure Clinic. She is also associate professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

References

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Barsuk JH, Cohen ER, Vozenikek JA, O’Connor LM, McGaghie WC, Wayne DB. Simulation-Based Education With Mastery Learning Improves Paracentesis Skills. JGME 2012;4(1):23-27.

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A robot-like person looking at a live person.

Published

2021-09-17

How to Cite

Sgro, G., Kelly, M., & Preisner, R. (2021). Comparison of Simulation-Only vs. Simulation + Live Training in Paracentesis. Patient Safety, 3(3), 46–52. https://doi.org/10.33940/med/2021.9.5

Issue

Section

Original Research and Articles
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